Events, Resources, The Movement

Calendar Alert! Upcoming September/October Events!

UPCOMING EVENTS

  • Our Etsy shop is now live! Get your copy of the comic book, a HOLLAHero kit, and other Hollaback: Red, Yellow, Blue gear!
  • Baltimore Comic Con September 8, 2013! Keep an eye out for Anna and Rochelle cosplaying as Wolverine and Mariko — or any of the volunteers with clipboards that have hot pink “COSPLAY =/= CONSENT” posters on the backs!
  • Saturday, September 28, 2013: March to End Rape Culture, 11am at Love Park in Center City, Philadelphia.
  • Saturday, September 28, 2013 Mice Expo: Meet our sister-site leaders of HollabackBOSTON as they bring the street harassment and cosplay =/= consent movement to Boston!
  • Saturday, October 5, 2013 Locust Moon Festival: We’ll be tabling at this local festival, with all our gear, swag, and exclusive goodies for attendees! You won’t want to miss it :) .
  • Saturday, October 12, 2013 New York Comic Con: The HollabackPHILLY team will be outside the convention hall with the leaders of our sister-site HollabackBoston and members of the Hollaback! Mothership, talking to cosplayers with swag and cameras in tow!
  • Saturday, October 20, 2013 GeekGirlCon (Seattle, Washington): Rochelle is presenting a panel on comics for social good, culture jamming, and a more inclusive geek culture. She’ll have comics in tow, and simple ways for you to get involved in changing the tide of harassment at cons.

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Events, News, Pop Culture, The Movement, User Submissions

Launch Party Harassment, at the event and online afterward, and Locust Moon’s stellar response.

While our launch party this past May seemed like a fun, festive occasion, with a great outpouring of local support for our comic and our CONsent project, some people were harassed by someone who was not only at the event, but who purchased a comic and showed support for the anti-harassment cause. Our entire comic-con anti harassment movement is geared towards shifting the culture of conventions and comic book stores to be inclusive of more than just straight male fans. Part of that inclusive culture means firm responses and zero-tolerance policies toward gender-based harassment.

Now that things have settled down from the release party, and we have brought the issue to the attention of Locust Moon who reiterated they have a zero-tolerance policy for harassment, we want to share the story with you all from beginning to end.

Anonymous’ Story: First off, I had a great time at your event last night. You all were so pleasant and your cause is one that has my full support. Oh, and the comic is awesome! It really exceeded my expectations.

Unfortunately, that’s not why I’m contacting you. I’m contacting you because a friend sent me this:  http://philadelphia.craigslist.org/mis/3830982425.html which is clearly about me. [Anonymous requested the post be removed, which Craigslist actually honored. So we’ve attached a screenshot]

Creeper (1)

At first, I thought it was really funny, maybe a joke. But the more I think about the sad irony of attending an event to end harassment and winding up on Craigslist’s missed connections, the angrier I get. If it’s the guy I think it is, I literally spoke one sentence to him. He seemed harmless enough at the time. To think that in those brief seconds he made my heart go pitter patter is insulting to me and the serious relationship I am in. He clearly mistook my excitement of purchasing your comic for “something very real.” And the end? How creepy is that?

This is exactly what Hollaback stands against. He reduced me to “a killer set of tits,” made vastly exaggerated assumptions about me, and removed my choice in the matter. And to top it all off, I am now hesitant about returning to that amazing comic book store.

Locust Moon seems a very woman-friendly store. That’s why I was so upset about this guy practically saying he’d be waiting for me there. Locust Moon is by far the most welcoming comic store I’ve found since I moved to the area, and I definitely plan on visiting whenever I can. But, of course, I want to feel safe.

I assume he is only a regular customer, not an employee. I realize this is completely out of your control and appreciate your support as well. I mostly just want to feel comfortable when I visit Locust Moon, and him to understand his behavior is totally unacceptable. I’m not entirely sure how to even handle this. I certainly don’t want any contact with this creep. But I would really like to feel comfortable the next time I visit Locust Moon. Any suggestions?

We’ve had nothing but excellent, supportive interactions from Locust Moon, so we sent them this information, including the name and photograph of the offender, and asked for their opinion on what they were willing to do as a store that seems to pride itself on being inclusive and welcoming. We also sent Anonymous an email letting her know how we planned to respond.

Anonymous response reminded us why we do this – because you should never be made to feel that you are overreaction when harassment upsets you; because you deserve support and a community that has your back.

Anonymous: Thanks again for getting back to me. I hope I didn’t blow this out of proportion, like some friends accused me of. I’m just very tired of the onus being on the victim though, not the aggressor. And I hate when people use the Internet as a way to anonymously threaten others. That’s why I want to take a stand alongside groups like Hollaback.

And Locust Moon’s response reminded us that men are often allies, and we if we trust them enough to talk to them about these issues, we give them the opportunity to be equally horrified enough to stand alongside us as we speak out against harassment.

Chris from Locust Moon: We’re glad you brought this to our attention, and only wish we had gotten this information sooner. We definitely want Locust Moon to be a welcoming place for everyone, and take the safety of our patrons seriously. This guy  has no idea how to deal with women, and I’m sorry this had to happen at our store, and that such a good night was sullied by such ignorant and childish behavior. Unfortunately (or fortunately), this guy DOES NOT come to the store often. While currently there is nothing we can do (none of our staff even recognize him), but he is no longer welcome at Locust Moon. This guy will NOT be allowed into the store if he tries to come by again. We will keep his photo on file and try to look out for him. This applies to more than just this one man: any person who harasses or makes threats against any of our patrons is not welcome here, and we do want to be made aware if any such behavior occurs again.

Please let Anonymous know that we’d love for her to come back and see the kind of place we are. We’d hate for some random creep to ruin her, or anyone’s, perception of Locust Moon.

While we were heartened by this response, and appreciated the re-affirmation that they strive to be a comic book shop that breaks the “boys only” mold, what was more important, we wanted to be sure Anonymous was comforted and supported. Happily, she was!

Anonymous: Comic book stores can be kind of intimidating to women, what with the whole “fake geek girl” thing many of us have to overcome. Dealing with some creepy guy who swears his love to me because we made eye contact is just one more hurtle I don’t want to jump. All I want is to enjoy some good literature. I’m very pleased with Locust Moon’s response. They clearly care about my happiness and safety.

So, if you are looking for a women/LGBT friendly comic book shop in Philadelphia, look no further than Locust Moon. And know, if any harassment is to occur, they will have your back!

I've got your back!
10+

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News, Pop Culture, The Movement

The Object Project: We are people, too.

Guest post by Audrey Webb, co-creator of “The Object Project”. 

From The Object Project: We are a blog dedicated to exposing examples of the objectification of women, men, and those who identify as neither in everyday life. Objectification of gender in different ways is something we have come to accept as normal and okay, something we do not notice. If we can notice when an image is perpetuating a harmful generalization or stigma, we can then combat it to spark change.

"Women are presented too often not as consumers of the product, but as part of the product - a sexy body, sexily getting ready to surf, or a sexy woman dressed sexily in American Apparel. or a sexy woman sexily wearing American Apparel. We're used to seeing women  look sexy and undressed in ads, while men in ads tend to just wear the clothes properly while also looking handsome in the face area."  Caitlan Welsh

“Women are presented too often not as consumers of the product, but as part of the product – a sexy body, sexily getting ready to surf, or a sexy body sexily wearing American Apparel. or a sexy woman sexily wearing American Apparel. We’re used to seeing women look sexy and undressed in ads, while men in ads tend to just wear the clothes properly while also looking handsome in the face area.” Caitlan Welsh

The Object Project started as a fun social experiment a couple of my friends and I did when bored at the mall one day. We had recently attended a couple of Gender & Sexuality classes at a local college and heard a HollabackPHILLY presentation. The class and presentation had really grabbed our attention so we decided to observe what we had learned in our daily lives, such as when shopping at the mall.

While walking around the mall we noticed things that we might not have usually taken much heed to before the HollabackPHILLY presentation. Such as when we were at a media store that sold music, DVDs, and videogames, where on the covers of videogames the men were dressed in full body armor, while the women were dressed in armored bikinis.

Another example is when we visited Spencer’s, a gift shop. A part of the store sold very inappropriate gifts, such as hats with the phrase, “Black out with your rack out,” and baby clothes with the phrase, “I love my Mommy even though she is a Bitch.”

My friends and I were shocked at the outright disrespect of women. This crude language and behavior are exposed to people of all ages, through shopping malls and through media, such as television. Because of all of this we decided to create a Tumblr blog in order to help bring about awareness

The Tumblr blog is primarily focused around the objectification of people, which seems to occur mostly with women in our society, but also explores other forms of social This project has only recently started, but it is something we care about. We want to bring about social awareness and help others to realize that we should not just accept this. This As David Hewson, author of the novel Macbeth said, “…Is your destiny such a small thing then? To keep your legs open and your mouth shut?”

Let us become aware, spread the word, and stand up! No longer shall we tolerate being given gifts such as the hat from Spencer’s, or tolerate being yelled at by a stranger, “Hey Baby!” We deserve to be treated with respect and how we want to be treated. We are people, too. Hollaback!

Check out: http://theobjectprojectblog.tumblr.com/

Send submissions: objectprojecttumblr@gmail.com

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News, The Movement, User Submissions

Phone App Submission: Man driving by in car taking pictures of her.

I was dog walking when a man in a white van appeared to be taking pictures of me. I flipped him off and walked away. He drove away and I went back to walking when he drove past screaming ” I have your picture”.

 

I've got your back!
7+

 

 

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Campaigns, Resources, The Movement, User Submissions

Anonymous’ Submission: Another (or the same?) Old City Flasher: he’s been at it for 10 years!

This story was submitted after anonymous saw Diane’s post about the flasher last week outside El Bar. We’ll spare you the cross-posted picture, but if you want to check it out, click through to see Diane’s submission.

 

There is a man who has been flashing himself from his shorts in Old City for at least the last ten years. I have seen him more than once over the years. Once in Molly’s (that bar no longer exists) and then I had seen him try to come into where I work too, but not in years as people have gotten wise to him. Both times on 3rd Street (between Market and Chestnut Streets) actually INSIDE OF the bar. When I actually was flashed (at Molly’s) he wore the mesh shorts and pulls this same thing – angling himself directly at me and my two friends and then when we noticed and make grossed out noises he seemed pleased. The bartender then kicked him out. Since they had gotten wise to him he may have found new ground. He looks quite similar to the man in the photo [in Diane's story], nondescript mid 50s-early 60s white man, but it has been a while. He drank Bud from what I remember, but I haven’t seen him in a few.

 

I've got your back!
13+

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Campaigns, Resources, The Movement, User Submissions

Diane’s Story: She snaps a photo of a man flashing his genitals in broad daylight.

some old dude sitting outside at the el bar had his junk out deliberately.

 

 

UserSubmission

HollabackPHILLY Note: We blocked out the junk to try to lessen your trauma, because it was just too much. His penis and scrotum were both entirely hanging out of his shorts, precisely where you now see that little black box.

 

I've got your back!
16+

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Resources, The Movement, User Submissions

Feliza’s Story: She braced herself for the usual harassment, but instead received a genuine compliment!

Today, I wore a dress I bought recently that’s close-cut and a bit short, but very comfortable for warm weather. I was getting gas and was about halfway done when a guy called out – presumably to me, since I was the only person in the station. I immediately braced for something weird – and he said “Just so you know, that’s the coolest dress I’ve ever seen.”

I wanted to shake his hand and say “Good job. You know how to give an appropriate compliment.”

 

I've got your back!
12+

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Campaigns, Events, News, Pop Culture, The Movement

HollabackBoston kicks off our Northeast Comic Book Tour today at Boston Comic Con!

In case you missed the big announcement, we released the Fall Schedule for our Comic Book Tour (see below)! Meet us at the cons, or let us know if we left off your local con so we can try to add it to the tour! While we prepare for Baltimore and NY Comic Cons, HollabackBoston is taking our comic book, “Hollaback: Red, Yellow, Blue” to Boston’s con as they talk to people about the “cosplay =/= consent” movement to raise awareness about cosplayer harassment.

 

To get the tour started we want to link you to some ballbusting feminist heroines. Check out Buzzfeed’s “23 Times Lady Superheroes Were 1000% Done. This shit, they’re over it.” A couple of our favorites are posted below, but reading them all definitely got us in the spirit to kick some ass, superhero style!

 

Wonder Woman is turned on by justice. Storm has no time for sass.

 

 

 

COMIC BOOK TOUR 2013 Schedule

Keep an eye out for our teams at the following comic conventions on the East (and one on the West) Coast throughout Summer and Fall 2013! We’ll have comics, swag, and information on our next steps! Share your stories with us to get some swag, and your stories will help the movement to create formal and comprehensive responses to cosplayer harassment, so conventions are safe and welcoming places for everyone.

  1. Boston Comic Con: Meet our sister-site leaders of HollabackBOSTON as they bring the street harassment and cosplay =/= consent movement to Boston! Saturday, August 3, 2013.

  2. Baltimore Comic Con: The HollabackPHILLY team will be outside the convention hall with the leader of our sister-site HollabackBMore talking to cosplayers, with swag and cameras in tow! Sunday, September 8, 2013.

  3. Mice Expo. Meet our sister-site leaders of HollabackBOSTON as they bring the street harassment and cosplay =/= consent movement to Boston! Saturday, September 28, 2013.

  4. Locust Moon Festival: We’ll be tabling at this local festival, with all our gear, swag, and exclusive goodies for attendees! You won’t want to miss it :) . Saturday, October 5, 2013.

  5. Tentative: New York Comic Con: The HollabackPHILLY team will be outside the convention hall with the leader of our sister-site HollabackBMore talking to cosplayers, with swag and cameras in tow! Saturday, October 12, 2013.

  6. GeekGirlCon (Seattle, Washington): Rochelle is presenting a panel on comics for social good, culture jamming, and a more inclusive geek culture. She’ll have comics in tow, and simple ways for you to get involved in changing the tide of harassment at cons. Saturday, October 20, 2013.

STAY TUNED FOR THE 2014 TOUR SCHEDULE AS WE FINALIZE APPEARANCES AND PANELS!

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The Movement, User Submissions

Abigail’s Story (phone app): “He stalked me down the street, making rude comments like: “You like it,” while groping my butt.”

Riding my bike towards Fishtown on Susquehanna, a man on his own bike rolled up next to me-so close I couldn’t make a get away. He stalked me down the street, making rude comments like: “You like it,” while groping my butt. I yelled and screamed and offered straight forward advice: You shouldn’t treat people this way. Nothing would dissuade him. When I nearly fell off of my bike he rode away. I called the police, but they said there was nothing to do. Trapped.

 

I've got your back!
18+

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Resources, The Movement, User Submissions

Amanda’s Story: She texted her mom to call her to disrupt the cab driver’s harassment

I saw you posted a story recently about a cab driver. I had a very similar experience the other day. An older man, “Oh beautiful, hello beautiful. You’re my beautiful. What’s your name baby?” It was so awkward. I told him where I wanted to go. He replied similarly… “Any thing for you. Let me kiss your hand.” I was so freaked out. Luckily I thought to text my mom. “Mom. Call me. A cab driver is hitting on me… eww, help.” Thankfully he backed off after my mom called – but not right away. I had to increase my volume to speak over him and let him know I was on the phone. I talked to my mom the whole ride. As soon as I got out at home he drove away. I hadn’t gotten his name or taxi cab number. I was just so uncomfortable. I wish I had.
I've got your back!
13+

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